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This list has been curated by a Central Park volunteer parent taking into account the Central Park mission and vision that incorporates a new educational model of STEAM, project-based learning, design thinking and passion-led learning.

 

Details change constantly so please Google the title for the latest accurate information.

 

This list was created based on the following principles:

 

1) It must be fun.

2) It should have feedback that helps the child learn other than simply "right" or "wrong".

3) Visual representations of concepts are a bonus.

4) Kinesthetic manipulations are a bonus.

5) It should allow the child to create solutions in more than one method.

6) It should have have room for a child to create not just replicate.

7) It should promote interaction not just 1-way passive observation.

8) It should have minimal advertising.

9) Educational content that aligns with Common Core or Next Generation Science Standards are a bonus.

Build with Chrome

BuildWithChrome.jpgNow you can build with LEGO® bricks using Google Maps as your baseplate. Imagine. Explore. Build online in Chrome.

 

https://www.buildwithchrome.com/

Instructables

Instructables_Web.pngInstructables is a place that lets you explore, document, and share your DIY creations.

 

http://www.instructables.com/

Make: Kids & Family

Make_Web.jpgMakezine celebrates your right to tweak, hack, and bend any technology to your own will.

 

http://makezine.com/tag/kids-family/

 

TinkerCAD

TinkerCAD_Web.png"Tinkercad is an easy, browser-based 3D design and modeling tool for all. Tinkercad allows users to imagine anything and then design it in minutes."

 

https://www.tinkercad.com/

Tinkerlab

TinkerLab.jpg"Teaching Philosophy

If you start to poke around my blog, you’ll notice that a theme of open-ended discovery and experimentation runs through a lot of my posts.

Here’s why I think experiments and a fail-forward mindset are important in childhood (and grownup-hood, for that matter).

1. Experiments teach children that there are multiple ways to approach a problem.

2. When children solve self-designed problems, they think for themselves and  build confidence.

3. Experiments remind me, as a parent, that I’m a co-learner and that I don’t hold all the answers.

4. The spirit of experimentation, exploration, and boundary-pushing is at the root of innovative thinking.

4. Experiments are fun and playful.

If you believe that there’s more than one way to do things, you’re attracted to the DIY culture, and you want to raise children who are confident thinkers, then TinkerLab is for YOU! I love the community that’s grown around these ideas and I hope you’ll feel welcome to join in at any time."

 

 

http://tinkerlab.com/