Central Park Elementary STEAM  Logo
Campus Directory Our Diversity FAQ Ms. Kamstra's Blog Mission, Vision & Commitment Spotlight On Team Chameleon
Guiding Principles Collective Commitments Blended Personal Project Based Environment Arts & Music STEAM Making Purposeful Homework
Afterschool Activities CAC Calendar/Bell Schedule DELAC Education ELAC Emergency Kits Extended Day Health & Insurance Important Dates Nutrition Services Organization Descriptions Parent/Student Handbooks PTA Remind School Site Council (SSC) Volunteer Forms
Chameleons Clip Art Library Library Lunch My new school Resources Make
Archive - March 2017 Archive - FEB 2018 Archive - JAN 2018 Archive - DEC 2017 Archive - NOV 2017 Archive - OCT 2017 Archive - SEPT 2017 Archive - AUG 2017 Archive - JULY 2017 Archive - JUNE 2017 Archive - MAY 2017 Archive APRIL 2017 Archive MAR 2017 Archive FEB 2017 Archive JAN 2017 Archive DEC 2016 Archive NOV 2016 Archive OCT 2016 Archive SEPT 2016 Archive AUG 2016 Archive JUN-AUG2016
Blogs Index Kindergarten 1st Grade 2nd Grade 3rd Grade 4th Grade Physical Education Garden Makerspace Project Cornerstone/Wellness Robotics Team
Donate Fundraising Volunteer DonorsChoose Thank You Supporters!


Student Launch Page

Looking for apps used in class?


Head to the Student - School Launch Page



Fun facts...

There are around 160 species of chameleon. 


Almost half of the world's chameleon species are native to Madagascar, they are also found in Africa, and southern Europe to as far as Sri Lanka in Asia and have been introduced to Hawaii, California and Florida.


Colour Changing. Most chameleons change from brown to green and back, but some can turn almost any colour. A change can occur in as little as 20 seconds. Chameleons are born with special cells that have a colour or pigment in them. These cells lie in layers under the chameleon’s outer skin. They are called chromatophores. The top layers of chromatophores have red or yellow pigment. The lower layers have blue or white pigment. When these pigment cells change, the chameleon’s skin colour changes.


Chromatophores change because they get a message from the brain. The message tells the cells to enlarge or to shrink. These actions cause cell pigments to mix—just like paint. A chemical calledmelanin also helps chameleons turn colour. Melanin fibers can spread like spiderwebs through layers of pigment cells and their presence causes skin to darken.


Many people think chameleons change colour to blend in with their surroundings. Scientists disagree. Their studies show that light, temperature and mood cause chameleons to change colour. Sometimes changing colour can make the chameleon more comfortabl. Sometimes it helps the animal communicate with other chameleons.


(Information from National Geographic.)